Low-Cal Diet Cuts Fat Around Heart in Obese People: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Heart function improved in obese people with type 2 diabetes who ate a very low-calorie diet, a small new study says.

Health Tip: Parenting a Disabled Child

(HealthDay News) -- Parenting a disabled child can be quite a challenge, but there are plenty of programs and services that can help.

Brain Pathways Seem Disrupted in Kids With ADHD

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The brains of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show abnormalities in certain areas involved with "visual attention," new research finds.

Health Tip: Breast-Feeding Is Good for Moms, Too

(HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding has been proven more beneficial than formula for babies, but it also offers benefits for moms.

Chronic Bowel Disease Drugs Linked to Skin Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be at increased risk for skin cancer due to their use of immunosuppressant drugs to treat the intestinal disorder, according to the results of two new studies.

Fatty Liver Disease Doesn't Affect Survival, Study Finds

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) does not increase the risk of death, according to a new study finding that surprised Johns Hopkins researchers.

Older Women Have More Post-Surgical Breast Reduction Infections

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women over 50 have more complications -- particularly infections -- following breast reduction surgery than younger women do, a new study says.

Heart Attack Severity May Depend on Time of Day

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The severity of a heart attack can be affected by the time of day it occurs, a new study suggests.

Doctors in a Bind When Parents Want to Delay, Skip Vaccines

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Mistrust of childhood vaccines is causing some parents to request "alternative" schedules from doctors, either delaying or skipping some shots.

Autoimmune Woes May Raise Risk for Lung Clots

FRIDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized for autoimmune disorders, like rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease, may be at greater risk for a life-threatening pulmonary embolism, a clot in a main artery of the lung, a new study finds.

Titanium Joint Debris May Trigger Painful Inflammation

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who receive artificial joints made with titanium may develop painful inflammation that could destroy bone and loosen the new joint, according to a new study of mice published by the Journal of Immunology.

Violent Video Games May Alter Brain Function: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- When young men who don't normally play a lot of video games are exposed to violent video games, changes occur in the way their brains function, new research shows.

Lengthy Hospital Transfers May Hamper Heart Attack Care

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. heart attack patients who have to be transferred to another hospital for a procedure to open narrowed or blocked coronary arteries aren't sent in the recommended time of 30 minutes or less, new research shows.

Second Cancer Often Same Type as the First, Study Finds

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- If cancer survivors develop a second cancer, it's most likely to be the same type of cancer as the first, researchers report.

Health Highlights: Nov. 28, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Patches, Counseling, Persistence Can Help Smokers Quit

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Quitting smoking isn't easy for most people but medication and counseling can help them succeed, according to the results of two new studies.

Head Size Tied to Regressive Autism in Boys

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Boys with regressive autism have a larger head circumference and bigger brains than other children, a new study finds.

Angioplasty Patients May Be at Risk for Rehospitalization

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- About one in 10 people who have angioplasty to open blocked heart arteries will land back in the hospital within 30 days, a new study indicates.