Health Tip: Yoga Can Help Your Health

(HealthDay News) -- No matter what style of yoga you prefer to practice, it's a great exercise that offers a number of physical and mental health benefits.

Health Tip: Give Acne the Boot

(HealthDay News) -- Acne and blemishes on the skin can affect self-esteem, but there are ways to keep skin clear and acne at bay.

Corticosteroid Creams Safe for Kids With Eczema: Study

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of topical corticosteroids to treat children with the skin condition known as eczema doesn't cause any major negative side effects, according to a new study.

Chronic Kidney Disease Tied to Heart Problems in Elderly

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic kidney disease is common among Americans over 80 years of age and is often linked with heart disease, a new study says.

When Size Matters, Men Can Turn to Penile Extenders: Study

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- For men who believe size matters -- and that their penises don't measure up -- success can be found in certain non-surgical penile lengthening treatments, a new study analysis by Italian researchers contends.

Babies' Persistent Fussiness Could Mean Behavioral Woes Ahead

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive sleeping, feeding or crying troubles during infancy are associated with a greatly increased risk for behavioral problems later in childhood, research suggests.

Poverty Can Hinder a Child's Cognitive Development, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent poverty harms the cognitive development of children, but family instability has no effect, a new study suggests.

U.S. Parents Want Kids More Active During School Day: Poll

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- A new poll finds that almost all parents of young children believe it's important for elementary school kids to get exercise during each school day. However, one-third said their children don't get enough physical activity at school.

Higher Death Rates Seen in Central Line Dialysis Patients: Study

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors should avoid delivering hemodialysis to kidney failure patients through a central line catheter because that method is associated with a higher risk of death shortly after beginning dialysis, a new study contends.

Behavioral Therapy May Reduce Tourette Tics, Symptoms

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Tics and other problems plaguing people with Tourette syndrome can be significantly reduced with relaxation techniques and cognitive behavioral therapy, according to a small new study.

Pesticide Exposure in Pregnancy Linked to Lower IQ in Kids

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Three new studies draw a link between prebirth exposure to a class of pesticides widely used on food crops and lower intelligence scores in children.

Gut Bacteria Falls Into Three Major Types

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Just like eye color or blood type, the bacteria that flourish in the gut can also be used to categorize humans, new research finds.

Health Highlights: April 21, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Smoke-Free Laws Moving Ahead in U.S.

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking bans in workplaces, restaurants and bars across the United States are now in place in half the states, and all such venues across the country could be smoke-free by 2020, government researchers reported Thursday.

Student Bullying Linked to Family Violence: CDC

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Student bullies, their victims and bully-victims -- those who are victimized and also engage in bullying -- face a broad range of health risks, including family violence and intentional self-harm, a new U.S. study finds.

Newer 'Pill' Linked to Higher Risk of Blood Clots

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Newer forms of birth control pills may carry a higher risk of serious blood clots than earlier oral contraceptives.

ACE Inhibitors Seem to Raise Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two commonly used blood pressure medications seem to have opposite effects on the chances of breast cancer recurring in women with a personal history of the disease.