Drones Could Deliver Vaccines in Developing Countries

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Right now, people often associate the use of drones with warfare. But in the future they could serve humanitarian purposes, such as delivering aid to people in developing countries.

Contaminated Gloves a No-No in Hospitals

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health care workers who wear contaminated gloves can transfer bacteria onto hospital surfaces, a new study warns.

DNA Tests May Spot Brain Infections

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic testing may help diagnose or rule out brain infections, researchers report.

Flint's Lead-Contamination Crisis 'Entirely Preventable'

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Analysis of blood samples from young children of Flint, Mich., shows they had much more lead in their blood when the city used local drinking water in an effort to cut costs, a new U.S. government study reveals.

Many Could Face Steep Rise in Obamacare Premiums for 2017

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many buyers of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act need to brace themselves for sharply higher premiums in 2017, analysts and insurance brokers say.

Health Tip: Skip Traditional Barbequed Food

(HealthDay News) -- Enjoy the summer ritual of barbequing without derailing your healthy eating plan.

Health Highlights: June 24, 2016

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Fiber: The Rx for Disease-Free Aging

THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Foods rich in fiber not only keep you "regular," they may help you live longer without disease, new research suggests.

Healthy Living Slashes Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and eating nutritiously can lower your risk of developing cancer by as much as 45 percent, a new evidence review concludes.

Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says

THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers in southern states can still find plenty of places to spread secondhand smoke to others, a new report finds.