Too Little Vitamin D May Add to Obesity's Burden

TUESDAY, April 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Severely obese people with vitamin D deficiency may be less mobile than those with normal levels of the vitamin, a new study says.

Drowning Deaths Down Overall, But Still a Problem: Report

TUESDAY, April, 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Just in time for summer swimming and boating season comes a grim government report: Drowning deaths are still a problem in the United States, even though overall deaths from drowning are down.

Health Tip: Practice Biking Safety

(HealthDay News) -- If you're out biking, make sure you follow the rules of the road to stay safe.

Clues to Type 2 Diabetes Discovered on Mount Everest

MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Research conducted on climbers atop Mount Everest offers new insight into the biological triggers for type 2 diabetes.

Pelvic Exercises May Help HisSex Life

MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pelvic exercises can benefit men with chronic premature ejaculation, according to a new study.

Getting in Front of Back Pain

SATURDAY, April 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Even though back pain affects nearly 10 million Americans a year, there's a lot you can do to avoid the problem, an expert says.

Specializing in One Sport as Child No Guarantee of Future Success

THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Some parents and coaches think kids who focus on one sport early on will boost their chances of a college scholarship or pro career. But a new study casts doubt on that idea.

Exercise May Curtail COPD Complications

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise might help reduce the risk of hospital readmission in people with a progressive lung condition called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study finds.

Aerobic Exercise May Help Older Women at Risk for Dementia

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Regular aerobic workouts increase the size of the brain's memory area in older women and may help slow the progression of dementia, according to a small new study.

Just One Season of Hits in High School Football May Alter Brain: Study

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Even among high school football players who've never had a concussion, a small preliminary study suggests that changes can still occur to their brains within the course of a single season.