Presumed Consent Wouldn't Boost U.S. Organ Donation: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- It's not likely that a policy of presumed consent would solve the shortage of transplant organs in the United States, according to a new study.

Health Tip: Participating in Winter Sports

(HealthDay News) -- Skiers and others who don't mind braving the cold for that "winter rush" can benefit from a few safety precautions, the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons says.

Health Tip: Keep Diabetes in Check During the Holidays

(HealthDay News) -- Holiday parties, desserts and buffets can throw your diabetes meal plan way off-track.

Spouse's Reaction May Affect Pain Management

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pain can hinder communication between spouses, which, in turn, can impair the affected partner's ability to cope with the pain, according to a new study.

WTC First Responders More Likely to Have Asthma: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- First responders at the World Trade Center attack suffer asthma at more than double the rate of the general U.S. population, new research shows.

Study Looks at Stroke Risks in Teen Football Players

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Playing football may put certain teens at increased risk for stroke, according to a small new study.

Drug Users With HIV at Much Higher Overdose Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-infected drug users are 74 percent more likely to have an overdose than those without HIV, a new evidence review finds.

Blood Pressure Readings Differ When Guidelines Followed

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Routine blood pressure monitoring measurements taken at clinics are frequently inaccurate and can affect treatment for high blood pressure, according to a new study.

Men Often Misread Women's Sexual Cues: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Men often have difficulty accurately reading a woman's level of interest in them, a new study finds.

Sense of Smell Helped Separate Humans From Neanderthals

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Modern humans -- Homo sapiens -- have a better sense of smell than their extinct Neanderthal cousins, which may be one reason why one thrived while the other died out, according to scientists.

Recession Hurt Parent-Child Ties, Survey Finds

THURSDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The recent recession took a toll on parent-child ties, with parents who were under financial strain reporting that they felt less connected to their kids and kids saying they were less likely to act with generosity, a new study finds.

Asthma Drugs in Pregnancy Might Pose Risk for Kids

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born to mothers who use inhaled glucocorticoids -- a class of steroids -- to treat asthma during pregnancy may be at risk for endocrine and metabolic disorders, a new study indicates.

Life After Cigarettes Is Happier: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Not only does their health improve, but people who quit smoking get a boost in their quality of life, new research finds.

Dengue Fever Cases Subside in Florida, But Threat Remains

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- While the alarming re-emergence in 2009 and 2010 of mosquito-borne dengue fever in the continental United States seems to have subsided, that's no reason to believe the potentially deadly infection won't be back, experts warn.

Targeted Radiation for Breast Cancer May Be Overused: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The number of women with breast cancer who receive targeted radiation to the breast after a lumpectomy has jumped dramatically over the last decade.

Health Highlights: Dec. 16, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

FDA Seeks to Get More Women Into Trials of Medical Devices

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Draft recommendations meant to increase the number of women in clinical trials for medical devices were released Friday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

New Device Approved for Children With Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- A cardiac assist device that's designed to keep a child with heart failure alive until doctors can find a donor heart has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.