Health Tip: Take Care to Prevent Stress Fractures

(HealthDay News) -- Stress fractures are common overuse injuries, and may take lots of time to fully heal.

Health Tip: Kids Should Eat Healthy, Too

(HealthDay News) -- Parents who give their kids healthy meals at home aren't doing their children any favors by feeding them fatty restaurant fare.

Older Drivers More Cautious Than Younger Ones After Surgery

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients drive more safely than younger patients after having outpatient surgery and receiving a short-acting anesthetic, according to a new study.

Blocked Tear Ducts Linked to 'Lazy Eye' in Kids

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children younger than age 3 who have blocked tear ducts are at greater risk for amblyopia, or "lazy eye" -- a condition that could result in permanent vision loss if not treated early enough, researchers have found.

Inflamed Adenoids in Kids May Not Be Caused by Stomach Bacteria

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammation and enlargement of adenoids in children does not appear to be caused by bacteria associated with stomach inflammation and ulcers, researchers report.

Hockey Fistfights Rarely Cause Injuries, Study Claims

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Brawls on the ice are a staple of professional ice hockey games, but are they as vicious as they look? A new study suggests that few punches thrown during National Hockey League games end in significant injury.

New Animal Study Might Explain Jet Lag Differences

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The way the human circadian clock sets itself may explain why jet lag tends to affect people more severely when they're flying west to east compared to the other direction, a new animal study indicates.

Some Kids Respond Better to ADHD Drug Than Others

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children with specific gene variants respond better to the drug methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta), which is widely used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study says.

To the Brain, Seeing a Caress Is as Good as Getting One

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Seeing someone else being caressed causes your brain to react as strongly as if you were being caressed, researchers have found.

More Than 1 in 4 U.S. Kids Witness Violence Between Parents: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More than one in four children in the United States has been exposed to physical violence between their parents at home at some time in their lives, and one in nine has been exposed to this type of violence within the past year, a new study says.

Breast Cancer Risk May Rise With High Hormone Levels

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated levels of hormones increase breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, and as the number of different elevated hormones rises, so does the risk, a new study has found.

Cell Phones Don't Raise Brain Cancer Risk, Study Says

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The 5 billion people worldwide who chat away on cell phones shouldn't worry about an increased risk of brain cancer, new Danish research contends.

Warning Signs for Health Problems Seen in Young Adults Born Prematurely

FRIDAY Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who were born very prematurely have higher blood pressure and more fat despite a normal body weight, both signs that may point to a heightened risk of health problems such as heart disease and diabetes later in life, a new study finds.

Femara May Beat Tamoxifen at Preventing Breast Cancer's Return

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The breast cancer drug letrozole, marketed as Femara, may be more effective than tamoxifen at preventing the return of breast cancer and improving survival among older women with hormone-sensitive breast cancers, a new study reports.

Race Tied to Risk for Arthritis in Large Joints

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks have a higher rate of multiple, large-joint osteoarthritis and knee osteoarthritis than whites do, a new study finds.

Research Suggests Penis Might Produce Testosterone

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Textbooks have long listed the centers of male hormone production as the testes and adrenal glands. But those textbooks might need revising if the results of a new study, showing hormone production in the penis itself, turn out to be true.

Health Highlights: Oct. 21, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: