For Kids, Natural Disasters Can Whip Up Worries

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hurricanes. Earthquakes. Floods. Tornadoes. Tsunamis. Terrorism. War. Predictions of Rapture and Armageddon.

Some Older Americans Overwhelmed by Medicare Options, Study Says

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although older Americans have many Medicare options to choose from, they may not be making good decisions about their coverage, according to a new study.

Health Tip: Why Do I Have High Cholesterol?

(HealthDay News) -- High cholesterol may be triggered by a number of factors, many of which you can control.

Health Tip: Skin Changes With Age

(HealthDay News) -- Boomer alert: Changes in the skin are a natural part of aging, and the changes can extend beyond wrinkles.

Troubled Teens Spotted in Routine School Screenings: Study

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Routine high school mental-health screenings can successfully identify high-risk students and help them receive needed care, according to a new study.

Simple Safety Steps Can Make Back to School a Breeze

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Along with buying new clothes and classroom supplies, parents need to think about health and safety as they prepare their children to return to school.

Mobile Devices Dangerous for Pedestrians, Too

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Crossing the street while answering texts or enjoying tunes can be hazardous business, a new study shows.

Many Use ER for Routine Follow-Up Care After Hospital Discharge

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many uninsured and publicly insured trauma injury patients who are discharged from U.S. hospitals return to the emergency department for routine follow-up care that could be handled at an outpatient clinic, a new study finds.

Use Caution in Ending Life Support for Brain-Injured, Experts Say

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Caution is required when deciding whether to stop life support for patients with traumatic brain injuries, a new study suggests.

Toddler's Dust Mite Sensitivity May Predict Later Asthma

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Toddlers with a sensitivity to house dust mites have an increased risk of developing asthma by the time they're 12, new research suggests.

For Women, Active Sex Life May Mean Better Aging

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual satisfaction in older women is associated with successful aging and a better quality of life, a new study finds.

Is Shape of CEO's Face a Measure of Power?

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The width of a CEO's face may predict how well a company performs, according to a new study.

Could Lots of Chocolate Lower Your Heart Risk?

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- People who eat chocolate regularly may not only be feeding their sweet tooth, but lowering their risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

Pediatric Groups Want to KO Boxing for Kids

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Boxing isn't appropriate for children and teens, and parents should encourage their kids to find sports that don't focus on delivering blows to the head and face.

New Blood Thinner May Outperform Warfarin for Irregular Heartbeat

SUNDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug, apixaban (Eliquis), appears better than the old standby warfarin in preventing strokes in people with the abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation, a new study finds.

Poor Sleep, High Blood Pressure?

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- If you sleep poorly, your chances of developing high blood pressure may increase, new research suggest.

Health Highlights: Aug. 29, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

'Gimme' Kids Often Grow Into 'Gimme' Adults

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who have trouble resisting temptation are more likely than patient preschoolers to grow into adults who lack self-control, a new study suggests.

Xalkori Approved for Advanced Lung Cancer

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Xalkori (crizotinib) and a companion diagnostic test have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a certain genetic abnormality, the agency said in a news release.