Health Tip: Try a Self-Management Program for Osteoarthritis

(HealthDay News) -- A self-management program can help people with osteoarthritis learn more about the joint disease and how to better cope with it.

Food Diary a Great Tool for Losing Weight, Expert Says

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The pen may be mightier than the scale when it comes to losing weight, experts have found.

Health Tip: Have Pain in the Back and Leg?

(HealthDay News) -- Do you have a pain in the rear that isn't caused by your boss? This literal pain in the buttocks could signal an inflamed piriformis muscle, which helps stabilize the hip, leg and pelvic area.

Anger at God Common During Times of Crisis, Study Finds

SATURDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Although people rarely talk about it, almost everyone experiences anger toward God at some point in their lives, commonly after the diagnosis of a serious illness, the death of a loved one or a trauma.

Snowblowers Can Remove Fingers, Too

SUNDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Snowblowers are a great tool for those who get lots of the white stuff, but while these machines may leave your driveway clear, they can also leave your fingers in a bandage -- or worse, experts warn.

Common Sleep Apnea Therapy Relieves Fatigue: Study

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with a common therapy helped obstructive sleep apnea patients gain more energy and become less fatigued in just three weeks and the gains appeared to be the result of more than just a placebo effect, a new study shows.

Medicare Makes Way for Baby Boomers

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- It's been a long, strange trip from Woodstock to the nursing home, but baby boomers are getting there -- and soon.

In U.S., Obesity Afflicts Even Some of the Tiniest Tots

FRIDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- American kids are becoming obese, or nearly so, at an increasingly young age, with about one-third of them falling into that category by the time they're 9 months old, researchers have found.

Healthy Habits in Youth Tied to Better Adult Cholesterol Levels

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A new study links cholesterol levels in young adults to changes in lifestyle between childhood and adulthood.

Soldiers' PTSD Tied to Lasting Psychosocial Effects

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Post-traumatic stress disorder may have long-term effects on troops -- including physical, emotional and cognitive problems -- while those who suffer from concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries don't appear to encounter symptoms over the long haul, a new study suggests.

Studies Decipher How Anti-Smoking Drugs Work

MONDAY, Jan.3 (HealthDay News) -- Two drugs that help people stop smoking -- bupropion and varenicline -- may change the way the brain reacts to seeing someone else smoke, new studies report.

First Physical With Medicare Now Free

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Starting this year, first-time enrollees in Medicare will be offered free physicals, courtesy of the new Affordable Care Act.

Colonoscopies May Not Have 'Blind Spot' After All

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to reducing the risk of cancer on the left side of the colon, new research indicates that colonoscopies may also reduce cancer risk on the right side.

Health Highlights: Jan. 3, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Family History of Alcoholism May Raise Obesity Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) People at higher risk for alcoholism might also face higher odds of becoming obese, new study findings show.

Clinical Trials Update: Jan. 3, 2011

(HealthDay News) -- Here are the latest clinical trials, courtesy of ClinicalConnection.com:

In Women, Diabetes Plus Depression a Deadly Combo

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Women suffering from both diabetes and depression have a greater risk of dying, especially from heart disease, a new study suggests.

Scientists Aim for Test That Could Spot Single Cancer Cell in Blood

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A collaborative effort involving U.S. scientists and private companies is looking into a test that could find even one stray cancer cell among the billions of cells that circulate in the human bloodstream.