Rehab May Not Help After Broken Ankle: Study

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After a broken ankle, many patients embark on an exercise-based rehabilitation program to help speed healing and regain mobility. But a new study out of Australia casts some doubt on whether these programs help.

Hormone Replacement May Protect Women's Kidneys, Study Suggests

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone replacement therapy may be good for a woman's kidneys, a preliminary study suggests.

Less-Invasive Surgery May Not Be Best Option for Rectal Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Minimally invasive surgery does not match standard surgery for the treatment of rectal cancer, new research indicates.

Optune Device Approved for Newly Diagnosed Brain Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday expanded its approval for the Optune device to include newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive brain cancer.

Face-to-Face Contact May Beat Email, Phone for Staving Off Depression

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While your days may be filled with electronic communications, a new study suggests that face-to-face contact may have more power to keep depression at bay, at least if you are older.

Grades May Sink for Girls Who Are Compulsive Texters

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Compulsive texting can lead to poor school performance for teenage girls, a new study suggests.

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals.

Doctors Use 3D Printing to Safeguard Baby Before Birth

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When Michigan doctors saw a large mass on the face of a fetus late in pregnancy, they feared it might block the baby's airway at birth.

Concussion Recovery May Be Delayed in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults recover more slowly from concussion than younger patients, a small new study finds.

Health Highlights: Oct. 5, 2015

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Boost Energy Without Caffeine

(HealthDay News) -- When run down, many people reach for an extra cup of coffee. But there are plenty of energy-boosting foods that don't contain caffeine.

Health Tip: Talking to Your Doctor About Weight

(HealthDay News) -- If you're ready to lose weight, a conversation with your doctor is a great place to start. But before you meet, make sure you're fully prepared.

California Gov. Jerry Brown Signs Right-to-Die Bill Into Law

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- California Gov. Jerry Brown signed "right-to-die" legislation on Monday that will allow the terminally ill to legally end their lives.


Making Sense of the Email Avalanche

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- That seemingly interminable delayed response to your email doesn't mean you're being ignored: it could be due to a host of other factors.

As HIV Patients Live Longer, Certain Cancer Risks Rise: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antiretroviral therapy has extended the lives of people with HIV, but living longer may increase these patients' risk for certain cancers.

Parents Can Take Steps to Help Make Homework Less Stressful

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Homework may be stressful for kids and parents alike, and it can be especially difficult for children with learning and behavior challenges, experts say.

Move More to Prevent Heart Failure

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to preventing heart failure, the more exercise, the better.

Poor, Minorities Spend More Time Waiting for Medical Care

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While almost everyone complains about the time it takes to see their doctor, the problem is even worse for minorities and poor people, according to new research.

FDA Orders Studies on Contaminated Endoscopes Tied to Illness Outbreaks

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recent outbreaks of life-threatening infections linked to endoscopic devices called duodenoscopes led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday to order manufacturers to conduct postmarket studies of the devices in health care facilities.

Routine Screening for Child Abuse Might Spot More Cases: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The early signs of child abuse among infants and toddlers -- head trauma, cracked ribs or abdominal injuries -- are often missed, and that may be due in part to a lack of standardized screening, researchers report.

Some Blood Pressure Drugs May Be Risky for Certain Surgery Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some people on blood pressure drugs called beta blockers may face heightened risks of heart complications during non-cardiac surgeries, a new, large study suggests.

Flu Vaccine May Also Protect Against Pneumonia

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a flu shot may protect you not only from flu, but also from pneumonia, the leading cause of flu-related hospitalizations and deaths, a new study suggests.

Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Seems Good for Teen Hearts: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Could just a few minutes of intense exercise three times a week reduce teens' risk of potential heart problems?