Blood Test Might Someday Predict Your Stroke Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In the doctor's office of the future, a simple blood test might gauge a patient's odds of suffering a stroke someday, new research suggests.

Adult-Onset Asthma Might Raise Heart Risks

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People who develop asthma when they're adults may have another health issue to worry about: an increased risk for heart disease and stroke.

Stress May Take Greatest Toll on Younger Women's Hearts: Study

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress may be especially hard on the hearts of younger women who have heart disease, new research suggests.

Cancer on Course to Become Top Killer of Americans

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer is on track to become the leading cause of death in the United States, closing in on heart disease as America's number one killer, a new government study shows.

Kids' Mild Brain Injury Can Have Long-Term Effects

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young people who suffer even mild head trauma are more likely to have serious issues later on, including psychiatric problems and premature death, a new study suggests.

Scans Show Range of Zika-Linked Infant Brain Defects

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High-tech imaging is revealing a wide variety of brain defects in newborns whose mothers were infected with the Zika virus.

Young Football Players Tackle Greatest Concussion Risk at Practice

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children under the age of 14 who play football are at risk of concussions, and a small study suggests that high-magnitude head impacts are more likely to occur in practices than in games in this age group.

Mouse Study Suggests Stem Cells May Reverse Stroke Damage

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Research in mice shows it may be possible to reverse brain damage after a stroke.

Teen Student-Athletes Often Unfit, Overweight

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Student-athletes may be more popular than teens who don't play sports, but they're no more fit.

'Business Diet' a Bad Deal for the Heart

FRIDAY, Aug. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The typical "social business diet" -- heavy on red meats, sweet drinks, processed snacks and booze -- takes a toll on the heart, a new study finds.