Too Many Pregnant Women Gain Too Much Weight: Doctors' Group

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women need to exercise and eat healthy foods during and after pregnancy in order to combat overweight and obesity and related health problems, women's health experts say.

New 'Collar' Aims to Help Shield Brain From Concussion

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new type a lightweight and pressurized neck collar may help prevent mild concussions during sports, according to the developers of the device.

Child Care Centers Offering Too Little Outdoor Time

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Preschool children at child care centers spend too little time outdoors, a new study says.

Exercise Can Reduce Heart Failure Risk, No Matter Your Age

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Starting to exercise later in life can still reduce your risk of heart failure, and even modest increases in activity could provide some protection, researchers say.

Yoga May Boost Quality of Life for Prostate Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga may benefit men who are undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, according to a small study.

Health Tip: Exercising With Diabetes

(HealthDay News) -- Participating in sports or exercising don't have to be dangerous if you're diabetic.

Health Tip: Using Technology to Get Fit

(HealthDay News) -- You don't absolutely need a fancy gadget to help you get fit, but technology can make it more fun and help motivate you.

Why Heart Failure Patients Often Get Too Little Exercise

TUESDAY, Nov. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A number of obstacles prevent heart failure patients from getting enough exercise, a new study has found.

Certain Antibiotic Might Combat Children's Wheezing Episodes

TUESDAY, Nov. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Quickly clobbering a cold with a certain antibiotic might help kids who are prone to severe respiratory tract infections, a new study suggests.

Experts Pan Gene Testing of Budding Athletes

MONDAY, Nov. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-to-consumer genetic tests should never be used on youngsters to identify athletic ability or boost sports performance, experts say.