Bike Helmets Protect Against Severe Brain Injury, Study Says

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wearing a bicycle helmet significantly reduces the risk of serious brain injury and death from a crash, a new study shows.

Whistle … and Walk … While You Work

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If you have to sit almost all day while you work, take a short walk whenever you can.

Move More to Prevent Heart Failure

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to preventing heart failure, the more exercise, the better.

Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Seems Good for Teen Hearts: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Could just a few minutes of intense exercise three times a week reduce teens' risk of potential heart problems?

Zip Line Injuries on the Rise

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Zip lining has become a popular way to experience a little adventure, but serious injuries can be an unintended consequence of that momentary thrill, researchers report.

Health Tip: Squeeze in a 30-Minute Workout

(HealthDay News) -- Finding 30 minutes each day and the motivation to exercise can be difficult. But if you find ways to make your routine more interesting and enjoyable, you may wind up looking forward to working out.

'Tennis Elbow' Usually Heals Without Therapy, Study Finds

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most people with tennis elbow recover without physical therapy and steroid injections, according to a study by researchers in Norway.

Sedentary Behavior Linked to Heart Disease in Hispanics

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanics who are inactive much of the time are at increased risk for heart disease and diabetes, even if they get regular exercise, a new study suggests.

Good Posture: A Stance for Better Health

SATURDAY, Sept. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy posture is important for your well-being, but achieving it can be an uphill battle in a high-tech, high-heeled world, experts say.

Catcher Injuries Aren't Usually the Result of Collisions

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Foul balls and flying bats cause most of the injuries sustained by baseball catchers, not home-plate collisions, a new study finds.