Avoid Medication Overdoses in Children

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medications for children -- even those you can buy over-the-counter -- can be dangerous if a child is given too much, one expert says.

Kidney Dialysis Increasing for Pregnant Women

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers report that more pregnant women are developing kidney failure, an apparent product of the growing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the United States.

Expert Offers Tips to Help Babies With Stuffy Noses

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stuffy noses are common among babies, but many parents aren't sure how to help, an expert says.

E-Cigarettes May Pose a Risk in Pregnancy and to Children

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine exposure from e-cigarettes may damage the developing brains of infants in the womb, as well as the brains of children and adolescents, suggests a new review of nicotine's effects.

Free School Breakfasts Appear to Boost Kids' Grades

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Free school breakfasts may help low-income students do better in the classroom, a new study suggests.

Health Tip: Turning Kids on to a Healthy Lifestyle

(HealthDay News) -- You want your kids to embrace healthier eating, but they may fight you if you push too hard.

Abused Kids Not Destined to Be Abusive Parents, Study Finds

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Conventional wisdom says that abused children often grow up to be abusive parents, but a 30-year study of American families suggests it's more complicated than that.

Health Tip: Plan for Children in an Emergency

(HealthDay News) -- An emergency supply kit should contain essentials for everyone in the family, including the littlest ones.

Ebola May Hit Young Children Hardest, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ebola appears to do its damage faster in young children than it does in adults, a new study reports.

Counseling Beats School Suspension at Curbing Pot Use: Study

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Students at schools that impose suspensions for marijuana use are more likely to smoke pot than those at schools without a suspension policy, a new study finds.