More Evidence That Boxing Can Lead to Brain Damage

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Another study supports the notion that repeated blows to the head in boxing or the martial arts can damage the brain.

Early Birds May Catch the Worm, but Night Owls May Snatch the Win

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Who's going to win Sunday's Super Bowl? It may depend, in part, on which team has the most "night owls," a new study suggests.

Eye Tracking May Help to Spot Concussions Quickly

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new eye-tracking method might help determine the severity of concussions, researchers report.

Muscle Weakness Affects 1 in 5 Americans Over 80

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 1 in 5 Americans 80 and older has weak strength in their muscles, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Weight Gain or Loss Linked to Fracture Risk in Older Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of broken bones increases with both weight gain and loss in older women, according to a new study.

Don't Become a Blizzard Casualty

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The blizzard conditions and frigid cold blanketing the U.S. Northeast pose numerous health threats, a doctor warns.

Health Tip: Identifying Signs of Shoulder Arthritis

(HealthDay News) -- Managing shoulder arthritis is easier if your doctor diagnoses the condition correctly and early.

Looking to Boost Your Exercise Level? Here Are Some Helpful Tips

SATURDAY, Jan. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The excitement and anticipation surrounding the upcoming Super Bowl may prompt some people to take up a new sport or up their levels of physical activity.

Knee Pain While Using Stairs May Be First Sign of Arthritis

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having knee pain while using the stairs may be an early sign of arthritis, a new study suggests.

Surgery Not Better for Spine Narrowing, Study Finds

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery and more conservative treatments provide similar long-term outcomes for people with spinal stenosis, a new study suggests.