Ebola Anxiety: A Bigger Threat Now Than the Virus Itself

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Headlines remain riveted on the three Ebola cases in Dallas. But, mental health specialists say overblown fear is a much bigger health threat to Americans.

'Desensitized' Parents Let Kids Watch More Movie Violence, Sex

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When parents become desensitized to violence and sex in movies, they may also become more lax about their children's exposure to both onscreen, a new study suggests.

Two-Pronged Program Looks Best for Helping Smokers Quit

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of counseling and medication greatly increases smokers' chances of quitting, according to new research.

Dads Face Guilt About Workouts, Just Like Moms Do

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Fathers face many of the same family and work barriers to exercise as mothers, new research indicates.

U.S. Kids Use ADHD Meds More During School Year

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- American children's use of stimulant medications is 30 percent higher during the school year than in the summer, a new study indicates.

Upbeat Walking Style Might Lift Your Mood

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The way you walk can affect your mood, according to a new study.

Family Acceptance Key to Curbing Teen Suicides, Study Shows

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Family rejection could be potentially deadly for teens already at risk for suicide, a new study has found.

Peak Pain Level Main Factor in Negative Childbirth Memories: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The peak intensity of pain during delivery, not the amount of time in labor, influences women's memories of pain during childbirth, a new study suggests.

More Evidence That Exercise May Help Fight Depression

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physically active people are less likely to show signs of depression, a new study finds.

Teens Still Sending Naked Pictures Via Cellphone

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A large number of American teens continue to send and receive sexual images on their cellphones -- a practice dubbed sexting, according to a new study.