Many Parents Unaware of Dangers E-Cigarettes Pose to Little Kids: Survey

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents don't understand that the liquid nicotine used in electronic cigarettes poses a serious danger to young children, a new survey indicates.

E-Cigs May Spur Teens to Try Smoking: Study

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Concerns that e-cigarettes are a stepping stone to smoking for teens appear to have merit, new research suggests.

Smoking, Early Menopause May Shorten Life Span: Study

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking and early menopause are a dangerous combination that might shorten life span, a new Swedish study warns.

Health Tip: Smoking Can Lead to Bone Injury

(HealthDay News) -- Most people know that smoking is bad for your lungs and heart, but experts say it also may take a toll on your bones and muscles.

Liquid Nicotine From E-Cigs Poses Poison Danger to Kids

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine poisoning is a growing concern for American children, but proposed U.S. federal government regulations alone aren't enough to solve the problem, an expert says.

Older Smokers With Migraines May Face Added Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older smokers who experience migraines appear to be at increased risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

Heart Disease, Alzheimer's Linked by Common Risk Factors

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some risk factors for heart disease may also be linked with Alzheimer's and other types of dementia, a new study reports.

Teens Using E-Cigs More Prone to Take Up Smoking: Study

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers who use electronic cigarettes may be more likely to smoke the real thing, new research suggests.

Low-Nicotine Cigarettes Won't Necessarily Help Smokers Stop

SATURDAY, July 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low-nicotine cigarettes alone don't help smokers quit over the long term, a new study finds.

Many Cancer Survivors Who Smoke See Little Benefit to Quitting

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors who continue to smoke view the habit as less risky than survivors who quit, and they're more likely to spend time with smokers, a new study shows.