Mothers of Kids With Severe Birth Defects May Have Shorter Lives: Study

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mother raising a child with a major birth defect may face a higher risk of dying early compared with a mother whose child doesn't have a birth defect, Danish research suggests.

Women Fare Better Than Men After a Heart Valve Replacement

MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women have a higher survival rate than men after a specific type of heart valve replacement procedure, a new study finds.

Chemo More Damaging to Hearts of Diabetics: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small study finds that cancer patients who have diabetes may suffer worse heart damage from chemotherapy, potentially boosting their risk of heart failure.

Taking a Holiday Trip? Protect Yourself From Blood Clots

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans will travel afar to celebrate the holidays, potentially putting themselves at risk for deadly blood clots.

Smartphones Could Be a Boon to Heart Health Research

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smartphones might revolutionize cardiac research by giving instant, accurate insight into the physical activity of people using them, a new study finds.

A Lengthy, Stable Marriage May Boost Stroke Survival

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients may have better odds of surviving if they're in a long-term stable marriage, a new study suggests.

Where You Live May Determine How You Die

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People along the southern stretch of the Mississippi River are more likely to die from heart problems than anywhere else in the United States.

Beta Blockers May Not Be Best Heart Drugs for Dementia Patients

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Beta blocker drugs are often the go-to medication for people who've survived a heart attack.

Certain Breast Cancer Drugs Tied to Blood Vessel Damage

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women on breast cancer drugs called aromatase inhibitors may show signs of early blood vessel damage that could lead to heart disease, a small study suggests.

Heart Failure Protein May Signal Early Brain Damage

THURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Higher blood levels of a specific heart disease protein are associated with brain damage, a new study suggests.